ChesapeakeProgress Social Media

You may have seen the Chesapeake Bay Program posting ChesapeakeProgress-related graphics on social media. Many of you have shared the posts — thank you! If others would like to share these graphics on your organizations’ social media platforms, please feel free. Suggested posts are below.

Facebook

  • Blue Crabs: Between 2015 and 2016, the number of adult female blue crabs in the Chesapeake Bay increased 92% — from 101 million to 194 million. Learn more: http://www.chesapeakeprogress.com/abundant-life/blue-crab-abundance
  • Oysters: Our partners have oyster restoration projects underway in six Chesapeake tributaries. Our goal is to bring this number to ten by 2025. Learn more: http://www.chesapeakeprogress.com/abundant-life/oysters
  • Monitoring: Since 1985, long-term trends for nitrogen pollution have improved at six of the nine monitoring stations. Learn more: http://www.chesapeakeprogress.com/clean-water/water-quality
  • SAV: In 2015, there were 92,315 acres of underwater grasses in the Bay. This surpasses our 2017 restoration target two years ahead of schedule and is nearly halfway toward our 185,000-acre goal. Learn more: http://www.chesapeakeprogress.com/abundant-life/sav
  • Air pollution: Air pollution from a 570,000-square-mile region — including parts of 14 states — can eventually end up in the Chesapeake Bay. But over the last 30 years, the amount of airborne pollutants entering the Bay has decreased, due in large part to the Clean Air Act. Learn more: http://www.chesapeakebay.net/blog/post/as_clean_air_act_clears_the_air_local_waters_also_benefit
  • Wastewater: Wastewater across the Chesapeake watershed has met its pollution reduction goals — a decade early. Learn more: http://www.chesapeakebay.net/blog/post/wastewater_sector_meets_nutrient_goals_of_pollution_diet_a_decade_early
  • Water Quality Standards: 37 percent of the tidal Chesapeake Bay met water quality standards during the most recent assessment period — an almost 10 percent increase from the previous assessment period. But more work is needed to reach the 100 percent needed for clean water and a healthy underwater habitat. Learn more: http://www.chesapeakeprogress.com/clean-water/water-quality

Twitter

  • Blue Crabs: Between 2015 and 2016, the number of adult female blue crabs in the #ChesapeakeBay increased 92%. http://www.chesapeakeprogress.com/abundant-life/blue-crab-abundance
  • Oysters: @chesbayprogram partners have oyster restoration projects underway in six #ChesBay tributaries. http://www.chesapeakeprogress.com/abundant-life/oysters
  • Monitoring: Since 1985, long-term trends for nitrogen pollution have improved at 6 of 9 #ChesBay monitoring stations.  http://www.chesapeakeprogress.com/clean-water/water-quality
  • SAV: In 2015, there were 92,315 acres of underwater grasses in the Bay—almost half of the 185,000-acre goal. http://www.chesapeakeprogress.com/abundant-life/sav
  • Air Pollution: #DYK? Air pollution from a 570,000 mi² area—including parts of 14 states—can eventually end up in the Chesapeake Bay. http://www.chesapeakebay.net/blog/post/as_clean_air_act_clears_the_air_local_waters_also_benefit
  • Wastewater: Due to plant upgrades, @chesbayprogram partners met their #wastewater pollution reduction goals 10 years early. http://www.chesapeakebay.net/blog/post/wastewater_sector_meets_nutrient_goals_of_pollution_diet_a_decade_early
  • Water Quality Standards: 37% of the tidal #ChesBay met water quality standards—an almost 10% increase from the previous assessment period. http://www.chesapeakeprogress.com/clean-water/water-quality

air_progress bluecrabs_progress monitoring_progress oysters_progress sav_progress wastewater_progress wqs_progress